You can usually find replacement brake pads by searching for the model of brakes installed on your bike. Make sure the pads are the same shape as the ones you are replacing, if not, that is a good sign that they are not compatible. If you are not sure, it may be best to visit your local bike shop!


Most of our bikes are a two piston brake design. Meaning that there are two cylinders in each brake pushing the pads together. In a couple select models we use a four piston design. Knowing which one you have is critical to getting the correct replacement pads. To simplify things, we have created a chart below that has the correct pads for each model along with replacement rotors. 


Pad Types

There are many different pad materials that offer different performance characteristics. In order to simplify things, we listed two types.

- The original replacement pads are going to offer standard levels of performance. 

- The pads listed in the quieter column are going to be an organic compound that will: grab quicker with more initial braking bite, will perform quieter under adverse conditions, but will wear out faster. 


It is up to each rider to decide which traits they value in a brake pad and rotor. 





Searching my brake brand and model and verifying the shape is a great way to find replacement brake pads that are compatible. 


BikeBrake Brand and Model
Original PadQuieter Pad

Rotor Size
Core-5
Tektro Aries
E10 PadE10 Pad
160mm six bolt
500
Tektro Aries
E10 PadE10 Pad
160mm six bolt
700
Shimano BL-MT200
E10 Pad
E10 Pad


700  Tektro HD-E350
E10 PadE10 Pad
180mm six bolt
LMT'D
Torque
Tektro Auriga Dual Piston Hydraulic
E10 PadE10 Pad
180mm six bolt
LMT'D CadenceTektro Orion HD-M745 4-piston
Q11TS PadQ11TS Pad
180mm six bolt


This video from Park Tool explains it very well and may be more than you ever needed to know about brake pads! It will show you how to replace them and discuss the different materials available.